James F. Mahoney, Attorney
Commentaries
 
     

May 2016

Independent Contractor Law Expected in Arizona

Anticipating the Governor’s signature on HB2114 this week, Arizona should have a very strong law defining independent contractors.

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To paraphrase:

ANY EMPLOYING UNIT CONTRACTING WITH AN INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR MAY PROVE THE EXISTENCE OF AN INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR RELATIONSHIP FOR THE PURPOSES OF THIS TITLE BY THE INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR EXECUTING A DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENT BUSINESS STATUS [and by the contractor declaring the following:]

… THE CONTRACTOR is operating an independent business and providing services as an independent contractor; the contractor acknowledges the absence of an employment relationship without any claim to UI benefits or other rights arising from an employment relationships; that the contracting party is not responsible to withhold any tax; the contractor is responsible for his or her tax obligations, for obtaining licensing, registrations, or other authorizations that would be necessary for rendering the contracted services.

There will be six of ten categories that the contractor acknowledges as existing in the relationship, most of which can  – or already are – in practice with our transport partners.

Perhaps the best benefit for those of us in the trenches who spend time educating courts and state agencies to the distinction between independent contractors and company employees is the explanation in the new law that “any supervision or control exercised by the employing unit to comply with any statute, rule, or code adopted by the federal government, this state  ... may not be considered for the purposes of determining the independent contractor or employment status of any relationship ...”

This will eliminate the hang-up that judges and agencies see as indicia of employment control. Since all motor carriers and freight brokers – to some degree – are obligated to enforce drivers to adhere to FMCSR regulations for hours of service, safe operations on the road, off-duty, and in pre-trip operations, as well as in communications with dispatch personnel, customers and general safe and efficient routing, this phrase eliminates that argument.

I would recommend that each of us review and amend – slightly, but quite importantly – our ICOAs with our owner-operators so as to comply with this law. Thereafter I expect a slight learning curve in educating state agencies, Work Comp insurance underwriters, courts and, not the least, negotiating with our contractors.

But this new law – expected to be signed by Governor Ducey this week, and effective August 6th – will unburden Arizona businesses from the vestige of impossible compliance with conflicting federal and state laws, and some costly litigation efforts.

Perhaps another benefit, which was envisioned bringing this Bill to fruition, is making Arizona more attractive to businesses across the West, particularly California companies escaping burdensome – and conflicting – regulations and insurance rates.

Re-domestication efforts can be considered. There are a few boxes to check off as companies consider this, and the benefits and detriments should be considered individually.