James F. Mahoney, Attorney
Commentaries
 
     

January 2017

Baseball Stats Have Statistical Rigor; FMCSA’s CSA Scores Do Not

Baseball has always had statistics. They’ve been studied to excess and its auditors have immense data directly related to every player. Not so with CSA BASICs.

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The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) provides that employers must pay non-exempt employees at “one and one-half times the regular rate” for time worked in excess of forty hours per week. 29 U.S.C. § 207(a)(1). The FLSA exempts “any employee with respect to whom the Secretary of Transportation has power to establish qualifications and maximum hours of service” under the Motor Carrier Act (MCA). 29 U.S.C. § 213(b)(1) (“the MCA Exemption”). Mr. Williams brought this action alleging that Central Transport LLC violated the FLSA’s overtime requirements when it employed him as a “switcher” at its St. Louis terminal. He tried to make the claim into a class action suit.

The question of how Williams spent his time working for Central Transport is a question of fact; the ultimate issue of whether his work activities exempted Central Transport from paying FLSA overtime is one of law.

In United States v. American Trucking Ass’ns, 310 U.S. 534, 553 (1940), the Supreme Court rejected the contention of that all employees of interstate motor carriers were exempt, concluding that the jurisdiction to regulate maximum hours “is limited to those employees whose activities affect the safety of [motor carrier] operation.” Later, the rule was expanded that motor carrier drivers, mechanics, loaders, and drivers helpers who “perform duties which affect the safety of operation… are therefore subject to the authority conferred [by the MCA] to prescribe qualifications and maximum hours of service.” MC-2, 28 M.C.C. 125, 126 (1941).

Mr. Williams was a “city loader” by title with Central Transport. However, he also did some minimal loading of trailers that affected the motor carrier’s safe interstate operation, including balancing loads and stacking cargo “high and tight.” The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals in a decision published July 28 2016 seems to have expanded a ruling from 1947 that even randomly assigned drivers, loaders, mechanics whose operations are quite minimally in interstate commerce (“3 or 4%”) are under the MCA exemption for overtime.